Choosing production tools


HP EliteBook 8760W - the Ideal Mobile CS 5.5 Workstation

Depending upon the project type, rendering with GPU-acceleration in Creative Suite 5.5 can reduce rendering time by up to 92% over CPU-only rendering. Since NVIDIA's CUDA technology is the only GPU that currently accelerates rendering in the Adobe Media Encoder and Premiere Pro, buying a notebook without NVIDIA hardware for CS5.5 production is a huge mistake.

If you're in the market for such a notebook, the HP 8760w is a dream machine that performs as well or better than a single CPU desktop workstation. If you need an external eSATA drive for production work, the Akitio Taurus Mini Super-S LCM should be on your short list.

Choosing a Graphics Card for Premiere Pro CS5.5

Suppose you’ve been running Adobe CS5.5 without an NVIDIA graphics card. You’ve heard about the benefits of GPU acceleration with the Mercury Playback Engine and you’re wondering how much time an NVIDIA card could save you. Or you’re buying a new system and you’re wondering whether to buy a dual-CPU system with an inexpensive graphics card or a single CPU system with a high-end card. Or you’ve got an NVIDIA card and you’re wondering whether a higher-end NVIDIA card will deliver substantial time savings. Well, if any of these cases apply to you, you’ve come to the right place.

New Review Calls Ozer Book a Home Run

Or, to be precise, the reviewer, Sundiata Cowels, say that I "hit the ball out of the park" (which won't fit in a headline). Here's the opening paragraph: The passing of Hurricane Irene (and the resultant power loss for five days) gave me ample time ...

RAM Requirements for Adobe CS5.5

This article is the second of a series on configuring your Windows workstations for producing with Adobe CS 5.5. The focus of this particular article is the optimal RAM configuration for both a single CPU and dual CPU system for producing with Premiere Pro and Adobe Media Encoder.

As an overview, I tested with two similarly configured systems from HP, who sponsored this testing, one with a 2.67 GHz 4-core CPU (an HP Z400), the other with two 2.67 GHz 4-core CPUs (an HP Z600). Both systems used the same graphics card, an NVIDIA Quadro FX 4800. I ran multiple tests, encoding sequences created from different camera formats, from DV to Red, into multiple outputs, from MPEG-2 for DVD to H.264 for YouTube and Blu-ray. I ran the tests with three different RAM configurations, 6 GB, 12 GB and 24 GB.

As I explore in the main article, except in one or two discrete cases, I didn't see a whole lot of performance difference in the results.

Free Videos: Overview of the Adobe Media Encoder Workflow

I just released a 3 hour workshop entitled Producing Great Video with the Adobe Media Encoder CS 5.5. It was produced by Video2Brain, and you can view course details here. I produced three short videos to answer questions you may have about the works...

Configuring Windows Workstation for Premiere Pro CS5.5

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This article is the first of a series on configuring your Windows workstation for producing with Adobe CS 5.5. The focus of this particular article is buying a single CPU vs. dual CPU system for producing with Premiere Pro and Adobe Media Encoder. I’ll also cover whether it makes sense to enable or disable HTT (hyper-threaded technology) when available on your workstation.

As an overview, I tested with two similarly configured systems from HP, one with a 2.67 GHz 4-core CPU (an HP Z400), the other with two 2.67 GHz 4-core CPUs (an HP Z600). I ran multiple tests, encoding sequences created from different camera formats, from DV to Red, into multiple outputs, from MPEG-2 for DVD to H.264 for YouTube and Blu-ray. I ran the first series of tests in dedicated mode, with nothing else happening on the computer. Then I ran a second series of tests with Adobe Encore rendering a very long file to H.264 Blu-ray format.

Click over to the main story for all the gory details.

A Final Cutter tries Premiere Pro

Creative Cow just published a thorough and thoughtful story about switching from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro, written by Helmut Kobler, and entitled A Final Cutter Tries Out Premiere Pro. Kobler starts by noting that he had been considering moving ...

Adobe's Vision for Professional Video

I thought I would share a video that Adobe just posted on their vision for professional video. The speaker is VP Jim Guerard, a thoughtful, impressive guy that I've met several times. Here are some of the statistics Jim discussed (which I cribbed fro...

Video - Two Free Video Analysis Tools; MediaInfo and Bitrate Viewer

There are two tools that I have on every computer that will run them; MediaInfo on all my Mac and Windows workstations, and Bitrate Viewer, which is Windows only and is installed on every Windows computer that I own. The first provides file-based information like data rate, resolution, codec, bits per pixel and encoding details like Profile and Level for H.264. The second shows a frame graph of the video file so I can diagnose problems like mid-stream interruptions.

In this video file, you'll learn why you need these programs and where to get them. Click over to the article to watch the tutorial.

WebM Encoding Tools: Five Popular Encoders Compared

This is a video that I produced for OnlineVideo.net on the subject. Here's the description.

In this video evaluation, Jan Ozer looks at and evaluates five popular WebM encoders:

  • Miro Video Encoder
  • Firefogg
  • Wildform Flix WebM
  • Telestream Episode Pro
  • Sorenson Squeeze 7

You’ll learn why some are quite good and others aren’t worth your time. Ozer shows video samples of each so you can judge for yourself.

Click over to the article to view.